| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • You already know Dokkio is an AI-powered assistant to organize & manage your digital files & messages. Very soon, Dokkio will support Outlook as well as One Drive. Check it out today!

View
 

Section C: Critical Enablers

This version was saved 14 years, 5 months ago View current version     Page history
Saved by linwells@gmail.com
on September 6, 2009 at 5:20:06 pm
 

Section B: Domains and Essential Services

 

C.     Critical enablers

1.      Distributed, renewable energy (microhydro, solar, wind, perhaps local geothermal, hybrid)

a.      General. 

     1. Microhydro. 

     Christ Corsten (chriscorsten@hotmail.com, skype) has been installing microhydro power (MHP) systems in Nangahar Province for the past several years under the auspices of State Department’s counternarcotics (CN) program run through International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL).  In mid-August 2009 he identified 38 sites where MHP sites are operating in Nangarhar, and he and his team are preparing to start 24 more by October 2009.  All will be finished within about four months of breaking ground.  Snow will not affect them much as they will be working in the eastern districts that have lower elevation.  Only one or two projects may have some issues but there are ways to work around it.  The western districts are more affected by snow: Khogiani, Hesarak, Sherzad.

 

In addition, her has completed a survey of over 450 potential MHP sites in Nangarhar, with the following range of potential outputs:

 

- 238 sites have a potential output between 2 Kw-9 Kw

- 133 sites have a potential output between 10 Kw-19 Kw

- 48 sites have the potential output between 20 Kw-29 Kw

- 18 sites have the potential output between 30 Kw-49 Kw

- 10 sites have the potential output between 50 Kw-100 Kw

-  7 sites have the potential output over 100 Kw

 

A graphic depiction of these locations, their operational/construction status and their power potential is available as a Google Earth KML overlay (file available on request). He also has provided a spreadsheet with detailed locations of potential sites in Momandara, Beshood, Baticot and Deh Bala districts (also available on request).

 

The power in the operating sites (roughly 50W-90W/family) is enough for lighting and fans and small electronics but, as Chris notes, “when you build power, people get creative with it.  For example, one of the projects is powering a private computer center where a house has four computers and is teaching computer skills and English classes with it.  As another example we are building a system next month to power the Ghanikhel hospital with 25 kw.  This will allow for lighting and fans for the hospital as well as small electronics and will save them having to use expensive generators as much.  Another example is where a school computer lab is being powered by a microhydro.” 


The full eight-page conversation with Chris is at: 
MHP in Nangarhar 9-6-09 Update to Aug 29 09 Chris Corsten Chat.doc.  Spreadsheets of his site locations are at Microhydro survey 15 Aug 09.xls, See also pp; 5-12 of Distributed Infrastructure in Afghan 2-21-09_1.doc and

     2. Solar.  See Scatec Solar and Solar Stik.   Also pp. 16-18 of Distributed Infrastructure in Afghan 2-21-09_1.doc

     3. Wind.  See pp. 13-15 of Distributed Infrastructure in Afghan 2-21-09_1.doc

     4. Local Geothermal.  See p. 21 of Distributed Infrastructure in Afghan 2-21-09_1.doc

     5. Hybrid.  See pp. 18-20 of Distributed Infrastructure in Afghan 2-21-09_1.doc

     6. Overall.  See Afghanistan Renewable Energy Businesses.shtml and Agha Khan Green Energy 4-17-09 MWAI-7RB34A.htm

     7. Barriers:  Need to get village buy-in and revenuie streams.  Pilferability of solar components.  Not very attractive to outside investors.

b.      Each of four district  capitals

c.       Each of 25 villages (average 30kW). 

d.      Camp for refugees or IDPs

e.       Figures for below graph based on “Distributed Infrastructure in Afghanistan” report on page 13, which can be found at: http://www.star-tides.net/node/379

 

Location

25 Generators

Engineers, Security, Vehicles etc.

Total

Per Year Maintenance Costs

Total for Ten Year Period

25 villages

$1,250,000

$750,000

$2,000,000

$125,000

$3,250,000

 

2.      Communications ranging from text messaging to cell phone voice, community/content applications to wide-band, high speed internet.

1.      Overall ‘physical’ extension / roll-out strategy & execution plan

a.       General

b.      Jalalabad

c.       Each of the four district capitals

d.      Each of 25 villages

e.       Camp for refugees or IDPs

 

2.      Overall ‘content’ / application development / strategy & execution plan

a.       General

b.      Jalalabad

c.       Each of the four district capitals

d.      Each of 25 villages

e.       1 refugee or IDP camp

 

3.      Refer to previous report by Dr. Wells on  improving (ICT) in Afghanistan for reference: http://www.star-tides.net/node/381

 

3.      Information sharing, storage and retrieval regimes to give non-traditional participants access to the information they need and building trust for two-way communication where appropriate

a.       General.  Must include world class library functions and reachback support from outside the country to supplement those on the ground.   Camp Roberts experiences

b.      Jalalabad.  B4D program.

c.       Each of four district  capitals

d.      Each of 25 villages

e.       Camp for refugees or IDPs

 

4.      Reachback support from outside the country to supplement those on the ground.

a.       General

b.      Jalalabad

c.       Each of four district  capitals

d.      Each of 25 villages

e.       Camp for refugees or IDPs 

 

 Section D: Related Areas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.